When Doing Nothing Is Doing Something

These are strange times we’re living in. COVID-19 (the corona virus) has changed our world. For most of us there is a feeling of utter helplessness. Compound that with fear and anxiety about what is yet to come and a steady dose of misinformation and it’s a real recipe for disaster.

What can I do? What should I do? How long will this last? Is this just the beginning? What about my older friends and relatives? What about my kids and grandkids? Hell, what about me!!??

Depending on your news source, the information you receive may differ from your neighbor’s. Depending on your job and employer, you may be without work or you may be working remotely. Depending on your age and general physical condition, you may or may not be a serious health risk. But no one seems to know exactly what to do/who to believe/what to expect.

Here’s what we know:

  • Wash your hands.
  • Social distance – keep six feet apart from any other person.
  • Avoid being in groups greater than ten.
  • Stay home (if you can).
  • Be patient.

We also know:

  • Healthcare workers are our heroes.
  • Law enforcement and first responders CANNOT work from home.
  • Many people will be unemployed for an unforeseeable future.
  • Prayer helps (even if we’re just praying for patience).

I jokingly told my daughter earlier today that I’m in ‘Day Three’ of my captivity. And that’s really kind of how it feels. I’m more about action than contemplation. I’m restless and I need to be doing something. But right now doing nothing is doing something. I’m potentially saving lives by restricting my activities.

“hero of [covad-19]” Maxim Fomenko 2020 – Germany

There has been a tremendous amount of caring and love and creativity in our world during this pandemic. Folks are posting positive messages on social media to lighten our moods. Local grocery stores have established “seniors only” shopping hours to reduce traffic in their stores. Virtual prayer groups are being formed. Artists are creating works to honor heroes and provide beauty and light amidst our bleakness. Nothing can erase the heartache of those who have lost loved ones as a result of this deadly virus. No amount of good cheer and patience will completely relieve the suffering of those who are struggling with poor heath or financial disaster. And yet, kindness, compassion, and gentleness will ease the pain of those who are suffering.

Each of us can do something by doing nothing. Stay home. Stay healthy. Stay hopeful.

And when your self-imposed exile starts driving you a bit batty, read a book, write a letter, make a phone call, post a blog.

Peace,

Denis

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